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Author Topic: Medici: The Magnificent reviews  (Read 1110 times)

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Medici: The Magnificent reviews
« on: October 17, 2018, 06:16:15 AM »
The Medici 2 Lorenzo il Magnifico preview and review
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Wednesday, October 10, thanks to the legendary Eleonora, I had the opportunity to crown a dream that I did not believe achievable: take part in the preview, the press conference and the private lunch presentation of the second season of The Medici: The Magnificent .

As the name suggests, the second chapter of the series focusing on the story of the most famous Florentine family in the world concerns the emblem of it, Lorenzo Il Magnifico .

A learned poet, art lover and enlightened leader, Lorenzo managed to bring the family and the city back to its former glory.

An incredible character, therefore, that Rai Fiction together with Lux Vide, Beta Film and Big Light Production has donated to the actor whom I admire and esteem most in the world, the man who over the years has become for me a great reference point: Daniel Sharman .

But let's proceed with order, therefore, and talk about the preview of this series that promises to surprise us in every single episode.

The atmosphere at the cinema "La Compagnia" of Florence , a few steps from the splendid setting of Palazzo Medici Riccardi , is festive and everyone in the room seems enthusiastic to take a first look at this new vision of history.

The story begins in 1469 , when the twenty year old Lorenzo takes the place of his father Piero ( Julian Sands ) in the management of family business and his beloved Florence.

A man who has always known the fate that awaits him and decides to embrace him with wisdom and cunning.

But someone plot behind him: Jacopo Pazzi (played by the great Sean Bean ) is ready to implement a terrible conspiracy because he does not accept the modern design of Florence that Lorenzo wants to propose. To help him there is his nephew Francesco ( Matteo Martari ).

Our hero faces the danger with the right dose of unconsciousness, supported by his brother Giuliano ( Bradley James , King Arthur in the saga of Merlin ), unrepentant bachelor but with a big heart, his brother by choice Sandro Botticelli ( Sebastian de Souza ), the brave sister Bianca ( Aurora Ruffino ) and her mother Lucrezia ( Sarah Parish ), probably one of the first feminists in history.

Women are a fundamental element in Lorenzo's life and politics, starting from the lover Lucrezia Donati ( Alessandra Mastronardi ), who comes to renounce him to allow him to become the Magnificent, up to his wife Clarice Orsini ( Synnøve Karlsen ), who despite having chosen a different destiny, he agrees to share his life with him and to become his point of reference.

"Women were much more than what we can read today in history books," says Mastronardi. Moreover, as pointed out during the press conference by showrunner Frank Spotnitz , these men of power would be nothing without the support of women behind them.

Although the history of the Medici is ancient, the message contained within it is more modern than ever: the constant struggle between static and change, between those who want to make a difference and those who prefer everything to remain as it is, because it is more convenient and manageable.

This, combined with the current world political scenario, makes us think a lot: do men always fall back into old mistakes, why does not history teach us anything?

In conclusion, we make a big applause to Rai for putting in place this incredible blockbuster (apparently, in addition to the third season dedicated to the Magnificent will be produced other miniseries on the Renaissance) and Lux ​​Vide, Beta Film and Big Light for believing in their own time and have contributed substantially to make it a reality.

On the interpretation of Daniel I would have many things to say, but it is still early to talk about: the first two episodes will be broadcast on Rai Play on October 18 , otherwise I Medici 2 Lorenzo the Magnificent awaits you on Rai Uno from 23 October 2018!
 
https://www.tvserial.it/i-medici-2-lorenzo-il-magnifico-recensione-video/




« Last Edit: November 11, 2018, 06:33:46 AM by patch »

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Re: Medici: The Magnificent reviews
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2018, 03:57:33 AM »
The Medici-Lorenzo Il Magnifico - review of the first two episodes
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After the long wait from the end of the first season of the Medici-Masters of Florence, on October 23rd 2018 finally made its debut on Rai Uno the second season of this series.

The first appointment with the Medici-Lorenzo il Magnifico registered an audience of 4,158,000 spectators, lower than the first episode of the previous season which totaled around 7,562,000 plays.

But in spite of this there is not to lose heart, it is still an interesting series that will surely have time to surprise the public.

The second season that has as its protagonist no more Cosimo de 'Medici called' the old ', masterfully interpreted previously by the Scottish actor Richard Madden, but his nephew, Lorenzo the Magnificent, gives us a look at the Florence of 1469, the era in which, shortly after, the Sforza family's attack would have been thwarted.

Lorenzo de 'Medici, son of Piero de' Medici and Lucrezia Tornabuoni, was the one who brought Florence to its full splendor, a man who loved art and culture, which the young Daniel Sharman almost managed to emulate with his interpretation.

The historical background

Already from the first two episodes the optic is clear: after the death of Cosimo, who had established a solid power over Florence managing his affairs well, the bank (remember that the Medici were bankers) under the guidance of his son Piero Il Gottoso it is going through a period of great difficulty, to the point that it arrives to collect loans long before the expiration, creating discontent and resentment among the people and their own class.

With the threat of the I Pazzi family to take advantage of the moment of the Medici crisis to overcome them, destroy them and take their place in the Lordship at the gates, with Piero wounded after an ambush that gave Galeazzo Sforza the chance to attack Florence so as to eliminate the rivals and in order to solve the problems of the bank, the young Lorenzo is forced to take matters into his own hands.

Lorenzo takes his father's place in every respect, Sforza stops and after Piero's death, he decides to roll up his sleeves to find a solution to save and re-flower the Bank of the family, including the marriage with Clarice Orsini.


But what's special and different?

The second season differs from the first for some elements, one of these is the suspense that in the first season has fallen on viewers as a hurricane since the first episode, while in this is milder.

Will the trend change or remain the same?

All that remains is to continue to follow it, so as to find out if there will be twists and turns that will satisfy the public.

The costumes, the scenarios, the props were able to make the reality of those times well.
The setting, therefore, does not lack credibility as well as some members of the cast as Sean Bean, who has fallen in the guise of Jacopo de 'Pazzi as if they had always belonged and gave us a shrewd and filibuster character.
Bradley James, known as Artù Pendragon of the Merlin series, showed a difficult and impetuous Giuliano de 'Medici, and Daniel Sharman, as previously mentioned, played Lorenzo presenting it to him as he talks about it in the story.



The flaws of the second season

Unfortunately, not all cast actors have stood out for the better.
Lucrezia Donati, lover of 'Il Magnifico', of Italian actress Alessandra Mastronardi appeared flat, lacking in expression and a little insipid.

We will see over time if, with his acting, he will be able to stand out or if the gap that separates it from the other actors of the cast will not be filled.

 
On October 30th the third and the fourth episode will air on Rai Uno, do not miss it!

However, there is the possibility to see them on the Raiplay platform
https://www.vsgraphicsandediting.com/single-post/2018/10/24/Recensione-I-Medici-Lorenzo-Il-Magnifico

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Re: Medici: The Magnificent reviews
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2018, 06:32:19 AM »
2 × 01 Old Rancors - 2 × 02 A Lonely Man

Season Premiere Florence, 1469. An attack by the unknown patriarch Piero de 'Medici will bring back old rivalries destined to go down in history and push a brilliant young man to come forward to take the reins of the family bank, becoming one of the most influential men of the Renaissance.
http://www.serialfreaks.it/medici/2x01-vecchi-rancori-2x02-un-uomo-solo/



2 × 03 Obstacles and Opportunities - 2 × 04 The Price of Blood

The season of love has arrived in Florence and the inhabitants of Palazzo Medici will have to come to terms, each in their own way, with their own feelings, while political conspiracies and unexpected alliances continue to intertwine.
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At the base of the vertical plots concerning the treaties with Milan and Volterra, behind which at times it is hard to keep up with them, there is in fact the intent to further explore the rivalry between the ruthless Jacopo de 'Pazzi and Lorenzo: actually Apart from the fleeting moment of agreement about the marriage between Bianca and Guglielmo, the dynamics between the two characters are rather redundant and banal, made interesting only by the interpretation of Sean Bean in the role of antagonist and by the wise resolve of Lorenzo, which allows him to keep his balance between the rigid demands of politics and the moral boundaries he does not intend to overcome.
http://www.serialfreaks.it/medici/2x03-ostacoli-e-opportunita-2x04-il-prezzo-del-sangue/



The Medici
 2 × 05 Legàmi - 2 × 06 Alliance
With Jacopo de 'Pazzi ready to do anything to defeat his rivals, Lorenzo will have to try to keep his relations with Pope Sixtus IV and the unstable partnership with Francesco de' Pazzi in balance, while Giuliano fights against everyone for the love of Simonetta .

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After the interesting deepening of the feelings and, consequently, the character of the protagonists proposed in the last episodes , I Medici: Lorenzo the Magnificent takes up the reins of the horizontal plot dedicating to it almost total attention, with the aim of bringing the rivalry among the Florentine families at the peak and then prepare the way for the events that will be at the center of the upcoming final season .

 In particular, the political plot is divided into two main narrative lines , which meet in several places but which touch different characters and dynamics. First of all, the dispute over the dominion of the city of Imola between Galeazzo Sforza andRaoul Bova Pope Sixtus IV becomes the perfect pretext to deepen the character of the pontiff and his relations with Lorenzo de 'Medici : if so far we have seen a conciliatory and benevolent behavior towards the young man by the man, who has even combined his marriage with Clarice when he was still a cardinal, now the friction between the Bank - and the family - the Medici and the Papal States is becoming more acute because of the expansionist ambitions of the latter, until the Pope even mobilize his troops to conquer City Castello , protected by Florence and devastated by internal tumults. The greater space reserved for the figure of Sixtus IV, also thanks to the implicit comparison with that of the Magnificent, is certainly a positive note within a political event that, as often happens in the series, is rather dispersive and confusing due to a representation unclear and which omits some useful premise.

Behind the growing suspicion of Pope Sixtus IV against Lorenzo are hidden the advice and machinations of Francesco Salviati , archbishop of Pisa who acts by order of the Pazzi, to which he is linked since childhood, and it will be this to bring us immediately to life the deepening of the historical enemies of the Medici family, more and more necessary to better prepare the ground for the events of the final season . As we could easily guess, the partnership between Francesco de 'Pazzi  ( Matteo Martari ) and Lorenzo de' Medici does not last long and indeed, is radically upset in an episode: from the opening scene in which Francis baptizes the son of the Magnificent while he throws himself in praise on his new friend who even make Giuliano jealous, in fact we pass to a definitive expulsion passing through pretentious and rather impromptu motivations. So it was really necessary to force the friendship between the two , bringing in some scenes even to excess, and then return within half an hour to the rivalry seen in recent episodes?

Surely we can glimpse in this choice the intention to make Francis better known to the public, giving greater depth to his grudge against Lorenzo, without merely justifying him by appealing to the historical rivalry between the families, but the way in which the man leaves manipulating from the uncle, coming to break the alliance with the Medici, goes in the opposite direction, weakening the characterization of the character. However, the positive implication of the focus on Francesco is the consequent protagonism of Jacopo de 'Pazzi  ( Sean Bean ), who continues to show his blind hatred towards the Medici and at the same time his wit and his ruthlessness, imposing himself as credible antagonist and well built , to the point that in some scenes can almost persuade the public itself of the legitimacy of its actions to protect Florence and loosen the grip of the Medici on the affairs of the city.

The task of dressing the two episodes of pathos lies with Giuliano and Simonetta , whose storyline is carried out in parallel with the political events involving Lorenzo. The development of their clandestine relationship towards its inexorable and tragic epilogue continues without smudging, also offering this week a look at the character of a fascinating and charismatic character like Giuliano de 'Medici, not at all willing to surrender to the rejection of his beloved because of her husband's suspicions, and an exciting representation of one of the most celebrated love stories of the Renaissance, a representation that, with the scene of the untimely death of the girl in the arms of Giuliano and the subsequent despair of the young, touches the the heart of the spectators in the simplest way without however being trivial or an end in itself.

The right combination of wars and feelings, symbolically represented by the painting " Venus and Mars " completed by Sandro Botticelli during the episodes, proves to be the strong point of this penultimate appointment with the second season of the Medici : the good dose of emotional involvement brought by the scenes between Giuliano and Simonetta - and, of course, by the exceptional assembly  in which the birth of Bianca 's son and the Pazzi conspiracies alternate on the notes of Reinassance - manages to distract us from the ups and downs in the political part, due to the evident acceleration of the narrative rhythm in view of the final season , and allows us to enjoy the good quality entertainment on which the series, although it could point a lot higher, has stabilized.

The imminence of the final season forces the series to accelerate the pace with regard to the political plot, penalizing its comprehensibility and weakening the deepening of some of the protagonists; Fortunately, a breathtaking editing and effective development of a parallel storyline help keep the viewer's attention and involvement alive.
http://www.serialfreaks.it/medici/2x05-legami-2x06-alleanza/


« Last Edit: November 11, 2018, 06:51:14 AM by patch »

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Re: Medici: The Magnificent reviews
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2018, 01:29:43 PM »
The Medici 2: review of the season finale
The Medici 2 is without the "poetic license" for which the first season of the series has been criticized
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Each episode weaves a plot of intertwining, alliances, betrayals aimed at gradually increasing tension, which explodes unstoppably in the final season, giving the audience an episode full of pathos and conflicting feelings. Good or bad we all know the outcome of the Conspiracy, but until the last second we hope that in some way the television fiction will change the cards on the table. Fortunately, the Medici - Lorenzo the Magnificent is without that "poetic license" for which the first season had often been criticized. Certainly some fictional divagation has been granted, but it is absolutely in the norm and within every limit, otherwise there would be taste.

Surprising the chosen casting chosen for the various characters that contribute to make the season 2 a success. Daniel Sharman (Lorenzo de 'Medici) did not fully convince the pilot, but during the season he proved to be a good Lorenzo the Magnificent, magnanimous, but also resolute and protective when it comes to business and family. The big villain of the season, Jacopo Pazzi, was played by Sean Bean , often a "victim" of various teasing fans because he used to play numerous characters who die almost at the beginning of every movie / TV series (Ned Stark in The Throne of Swords , Boromir in The Lord of the Rings just to name a couple); in The Medici at least Sean Bean managed to survive for a whole season, giving his best with his Jacopo. On the other hand Bean is perfect in the roles of villain, interprets them so well - intensity of looks, mocking and cruel smile, gestures from conspiracies and intrigues - that it is really impossible to love them or try to understand their actions even for a moment.

The Italian Matteo Martari stands up to Sean Bean for the interpretation of an antagonist. He and Bean form a perfect couple in the role of Francesco and Jacopo Pazzi, showing a surprising alchemy.
The Medici - Lorenzo Il Magnifico was truly a great surprise, especially after the disappointments aroused by the first season of the series.
https://www.cinematographe.it/recensioni-serie/i-medici-2-recensione-finale/

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Re: Medici: The Magnificent reviews
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2019, 01:14:57 AM »
Medici: the Magnificent, review: why does Sean Bean look so grumpy? This historical soap is meant to be fun
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The back-stabbing, bed-hopping antics of Renaissance Italy’s ruling dynasties have an obvious appeal in the era of Game of Thrones. And there is indeed a whiff of HBO’s bums-and-dragons saga in Medici: the Magnificent, a collaboration between Netflix and Italian production house Luxe Vide.   
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/tv/2019/01/25/medici-magnificent-review-does-sean-bean-look-grumpy-historical/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter


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Re: Medici: The Magnificent reviews
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2019, 03:24:35 AM »
Medici: The Magnificent Season 2 Review
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Back for a second season, Medici returns for another slice of biographical drama involving the infamous Italian family. Set some time after the events of the first season, Medici: The Magnificent sets its sights on Lorenzo and his siblings for these 8 hour-long episodes. With a renewed vision and a fresh perspective, the second season turns a blind eye to historical accuracy, instead depicting a story rich in drama and tension but not quite hitting that same standard the first achieved so valiantly.

Whereas last year’s story gravitated around an intense rivalry between Rinaldo and Cosimo, with a dash of mystery around his father’s death for good measure, this second season is far more straightforward. Most of the drama revolves around a bitter feud involving the Medici and Pazzi family. Fronted by the hot-headed Jacopo de’ Pazzi, these men do everything in their power to undermine the Medici’s. Sensing an opportunity to snatch at power during this tumultuous time, the opportunistic youth Lorenzo goes behind his father’s back early on in the season and makes himself head of the bank.

In this life you reap what you sow and with this added responsibility of leadership comes a wealth of debts that threaten to overwhelm him; a tough price to pay for becoming leader. Fortunately, Lorenzo has the business savvy blood of the Medici’s coursing through his veins and what follows is an intricate web of negotiations, deals and alliances being formed across the season in a bid to make the Medici household a powerhouse once more.

Alongside this familial journey to resurgence are various love interests, triangles and affairs that bleed into the main narrative of the story. While Lorenzo does manage to instill more charismatic charm compared to Cosimo last season, the depiction of this man as more of a favourable protagonist than he actually was is a perfect example of the historical accuracy being abandoned. It’s particularly disappointing too when you consider the way Cosimo was presented last season.

Still, the cinematography and general set design is just as impressive here as it was in the first season. Now completed in its entirety, the various shots of the Florence cathedral dome and establishing shots in, and around, Florence are beautifully captured. On top of that, the streets are bursting with life which works well to complement the costume and set design teams who, again, do a wonderful job bringing the fifteenth century to life.

While still compelling and endearing throughout, in comparison to last season Medici: The Magnificent just doesn’t have the same star power and aura. The decision to steer away from historical accuracy in favour of a more dramatic and politically intriguing plot is a bit of a shame too and a noticeable drop in acting quality does hurt the show too. While still enjoyable, Medici The Magnificent doesn’t quite achieve its self-titled expectations, instead falling closer to Medici The Acceptable instead.
 
http://www.thereviewgeek.com/medici-s2review/


Medici: Masters of Florence, Season Two (2018)
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The continuation of the Medici saga is now on Netflix. Season One portrayed the rise of  the Medici banking clan in Florence from simple merchants to masters of the city under the leadership of Giovanni (Dustin Hoffman) and his son Cosimo de Medici (Richard Madden). Season Two opens with the Medicis still embroiled in a struggle for control with the Pazzi family, their long time rivals. The Pazzi (from whom came the Carmelite saint and mystic St. Maria Magdalena de Pazzi) are an ancient noble family who see the Medicis as nouveau riches usurpers. The Pazzi never lose a single opportunity to remind the Medicis that they started out as wool merchants, whereas the Pazzi are descended from crusaders. Sean Bean stars as the head of the Pazzi clan, Jacopo de' Pazzi. Young Lorenzo de Medici (Daniel Sharman) sees that his ailing father Piero (Julian Sands) is not able to manage the situation and so he must make some hard decisions in order to save his family and his city. Lorenzo is advised by his brilliant and devout mother Lucrezia (Sarah Parish) and later by his wife Clarice Orsini (Synnøve Karlsen). Clarice is an endearing character who puts personalities before politics. While women may not have always had a direct political role, they certainly had enormous influence behind the scenes. Meanwhile, Lorenzo's younger brother Guiliano (Bradley James) becomes embroiled with a married woman, Simonetta Vespucci, who is posing as Venus for their mutual friend Botticelli ( Sebastian de Souza).

 Season Two is as addictive as Season One, so be prepared to watch several episodes at once. Filmed in Italy, the sets and costumes are glorious. The music, banqueting and dancing scenes are sumptuous. The Medici palace, with frescoes on all the walls, is exquisitely recreated. The theme song is especially captivating. It is not a family show, however, which is a shame since there is so much to learn about both art and history. Italian politics during the Renaissance were notoriously bloody but even so several lines are crossed by the Pazzi as they attempt to destroy the Medici. The suspense spirals into an almost unbelievable climax which is hard to digest even though it really happened. Amid great tragedy, Lorenzo's power is solidified and he is on his way to becoming Il Magnifico. 
http://teaattrianon.blogspot.com/2019/01/medici-masters-of-florence-season-two.html

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Re: Medici: The Magnificent reviews
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2019, 02:00:31 AM »
TV Review: 'Medici: The Magnificent'
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When viewers of "Medici" last saw the series' titular family, the story left off with its focus on their groundbreaking leader, Cosimo. Leaping forward in time, “Medici: The Magnificent” picks up with Cosimo’s eldest grandson, Lorenzo (Daniel Sharman), as a grown man.

 Lorenzo’s father and Cosimo’s son, Piero, is not in the best health when the season begins. A situation, which grows more troubled during the first episode. From the outset, it is evident that Lorenzo is the rising star and eventual leader of his family, which also includes his younger brother Giuliano (Bradley James) and sister Bianca (Aurora Ruffino).

As the title hints, his qualities enchant almost everyone around him. The exception being the leader of the Pazzi family, Jacopo de’ Pazzi (Sean Bean). He longs to see the Medicis' downfall, and he goes to great lengths to achieve his goal.

“Medici: The Magnificent” has it all. A likable hero at its forefront and a terrific villain to combat him. Their blood feud providing ample teeth to “Medici.”

Between the family feud, ensuing scheming, political intrigue, sumptuous romances, off-limits love affairs, and battles for one’s soul, “Medici: The Magnificent” is an all-encompassing experience. The series' second installment is fast-paced without rushing and riveting at every turn.

 There are characters to root for and romances worth cheering to see thrive. The exception being those of the star-crossed variety. Unlike many other series, that would stew over those particular plots, “Medici” does not get weighed down by them. Treating the storylines with consequence without getting distracted.

 The second season offers a phenomenally absorbing overall story that enraptures throughout. There are no dull spots and with eight episodes, “Medici” builds Lorenzo up to almost superhero proportions. Something that would be hard-to-swallow, if it did not manifest with so much sincerity.

While not without his flaws, Lorenzo is showcased as brilliant, witty, kind-hearted, and courageous. Hence, it is hard to reconcile why he would carry on the romance, he does at the start of the season. Still, people are complicated and "Medici" deftly makes that point numerous times.

 For the most part, though, Lorenzo is depicted as a renaissance man, who is capable of pretty much anything with a well-intentioned heart for his family as his driving force. As with any well-written character, there is an enigmatic edge to his persona.

 Considering how Lorenzo is characterized, it makes Jacopo de’ Pazzi’s hatred for him and his family span from irrational to downright puzzling. One theory to understand it is to attribute it to simple jealousy.

 The Medici dynasty has it all, including a young leader capable of carrying on his family’s power. Jacopo has no such person to carry on his family’s legacy. His nephews are no match for Lorenzo, and he knows it.

 It is a petty thing, but as “Medici” demonstrates -- some would rather live in darkness than let a light, not belonging to them, shine.

 The writing for the second installment is incredible, and with so much to work through, it is spell-binding. Be warned that it is best to save any historical research, until after you have finished watching.

There is no sense in spoiling any of the series' numerous twists and turns. All of which leads to one of the most emotionally intense finales personally watched in recent memory. It is there, you truly grasp how deeply the show's characters have come to grip you. While anticipated, the impact of the season even took this viewer by surprise.

 Having leaped forward a generation, the second installment of the series feels all-together new. There is a connection provided via Medici matriarch, Contessina.

 The scene-stealing Annabel Scholey reprises her role from “Masters of Florence,” furthering the connection between the seasons. Her fantastic performance as the honorable Contessina serving as yet another bright spot to "The Magnificent" as she is shown via flashbacks, imparting wisdom on Lorenzo as a kid.

 The sequel season charts its own course, while also giving viewers the action and adventure that filled "Masters of Florence." In another parallel to its predecessor, "The Magnificent" is also expertly cast. Filled to the brim with a talented ensemble that brings out all the dimension and depth present in its complicated characters.

Maintaining the tradition of headlining the season with an actor who starred in “Game of Thrones,” Sean Bean takes over the reins from Richard Madden. Unlike Madden, who played the Medicis' patriarch, Bean stars as their arch rival.

 Every good story needs a great villain, and Bean delivers as the devious Jacopo. Whereas Matteo Martari compellingly portrays Francesco, the Pazzi caught in between. His allegiances hovering, torn, and upended throughout the season.

Taking over as the series’ lead, Daniel Sharman is tasked with following the remarkable run of Richard Madden. Impressively, Sharman succeeds in doing just that with a breakout turn of his own, which hints at more to come.

 Lorenzo is complexly written and thanks to Sharman, he is also portrayed that way. Whether swashbuckling or savvy, he shows the range that is necessary to bring it all to the screen.

 The supporting cast is equally impressive. “Merlin” star Bradley James is charismatic as Lorenzo’s brother, Giuliano. Even as Giuliano does unlikable things, James gets one to take the leap in attributing his folly to rampant romanticism and not cold-hearted lust.

 As “Masters of Florence” did with Contessina, “The Magnificent” gives viewers another virtuous woman caught in the Medici family’s endless intrigue. Synnøve Karlsen portrays the devout Clarice with grace and dignity. Meanwhile, Alessandra Mastronardi also impresses as Lorenzo's initial love interest, Lucrezia.

 What “Medici” creators Nicholas Meyer and Frank Spotnitz have created is an indelible follow-up to its original installment. “The Magnificent” is not only all the things mentioned above. It is thought-provoking, going beyond the realm of sheer entertainment value.

 "Medici" is a series on the level of every prestige period drama around. A winner with no end in sight and a fascinating family that can carry a series, indefinitely. Another season cannot arrive soon enough.
 
https://www.eclecticpop.com/2019/02/tv-review-medici-magnificent.html