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Author Topic: Sean Bean interview  (Read 550 times)

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Sean Bean interview
« on: October 24, 2018, 11:14:27 AM »
Sean Bean: “Jeremy Corbyn does actually believe in what he stands for”

About to star in new series Medici: The Magnificent, the actor discusses the lessons of the medieval Florentine dynasty.
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Sean Bean is having a vape and an espresso in the Palazzo Medici. As he puffs away in a chamber filled with autumnal Florentine sunshine from its grand arched windows, the English actor’s choice of vice appears incongruous in such luxurious surroundings. A tray with Prosecco and glasses sits untouched on an oval table.

I meet him here, beneath a high ceiling adorned with bas-reliefs and walls of Renaissance paintings, because he’s promoting Medici: The Magnificent, a big-budget Netflix series that sees the 59-year-old play the snarling, manipulative nobleman Jacopo Pazzi – head of a rival family to the House of Medici in medieval Florence. The first scene is a classic Bean entrance: wielding a sword at his enemy, his shoulder-length hair aflutter, he remarks: “Always looking for trouble, aren’t you boy?” Cue duel.

His green eyes flash similarly today, though his hair is cut short, there’s a brush of stubble, and he’s traded his doublet for a smartly pressed navy shirt. The Yorkshireman’s familiar Sheffield vowels are back, too.

“It [swordfighting] is something I quite enjoy, there ain’t no lines to learn,” he laughs, a veteran of fight scenes from more than three decades of playing action villains and noble fighters alike. “Every character I’ve played with a sword is always a good swordsman. There’s hardly anybody who’s crap is there?”

Wryly aware of his CV of macho roles – from a heartthrob rifleman in the Nineties TV series Sharpe and James Bond’s nemesis in GoldenEye, to Lord of the Rings’s Boromir and Ned Stark of Game of Thrones’s first season – he still regards Medici as a fresh career move.

The high-end drama was filmed in its historical setting, from the hilltops of Tuscany to this very Palazzo. “Subconsciously you absorb it,” he grins. “You just take it for granted that you are in a nice big cathedral with cobbled streets… When you’re at school, in history, it was a bit of a drudge wasn’t it? Because you couldn’t picture anything.”

Yet Bean jokes about flicking to the back of scripts when he receives them, so often has he come to an untimely end on screen (the real-life Jacopo was eventually hanged).

His tally of 25 deaths is so varied – showered with arrows, torn apart by horses, buried alive, decapitated, toppled off a cliff by cows and many more – that he’s become an internet meme with the #DontKillSeanBean hashtag. There’s even a “death reel” on YouTube, compiling his colourful demises. “I’m not complaining, I don’t mind about that, I’ve been some wonderful characters,” he smiles. “But I have been surviving quite a bit recently – well, up to about last year!”

He’s happy to laugh at his career, playing himself as a “spirit guide” cross between Boromir and Stark in Channel 4 stoner comedy Wasted, but says he prefers “personal, smaller dramas”. “If you’re playing one-dimensional characters, which you usually are in the big blockbuster things, that’s fine, that’s fair enough, but you can’t sustain yourself on that.”

One very different role clearly fills Bean with pride: the quietly haunted Father Michael Kerrigan in Broken, last year’s BBC series about a parish priest in a deprived north-west suburb. Bean has previously condemned Margaret Thatcher for destroying  the north’s industries.

He was brought up in Sixties Sheffield by his father, who owned a welding business, and his mother, who worked as its secretary. His family never moved out of the two-bedroom former council house where he grew up.

Bean, who praised Jeremy Corbyn in 2015 after the Labour leader was first elected, appears frustrated today. “He [Corbyn] does actually believe in what he stands for,” he says. “Although he’s often made to make compromises ever since he’s become leader, he’s had a constant attempt to compromise him and I guess he’s treading a fine line – he’s got the press against him, hasn’t he, in the main?”

While Italian audiences will draw comparisons between their tempestuous politics and the factionalism of the Medici rulers, Bean also sees parallels with Britain.

“At least in the Medici, it looks believable what they’re saying, you think they’re actually feeling it,” he says. “Whereas today, you watch people talking and they sound like mouthpieces – like something with a CD in the back of it.


“It’s like Theresa May, she’s just like” – he puts on a mechanical voice – “WAH WAH, like a kind of robot. How can they keep repeating the same things and expect us to believe it? ‘Brexit means Brexit’? I mean, how many fucking times can you say that?”

He repeats in a slow-motion drawl: “Breeexit means Breeexit. It doesn’t actually make any sense. Nothing makes sense any more, nothing. It’s just like background music, lift music. And I think that, you know, [they’re] just kind of outright liars, really, for the most part.”

After playing his Machiavellian character, he reflects that politicians “use any means at their disposal in order to protect their positions and keep their privileges. And ultimately, they justify it now by calling it ‘democracy’, don’t they? But there’s a lot of strings attached!” 

“Medici: The Magnificent”, produced by Lux Vide, is on Netflix from early January 2019
https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/uk/2018/10/sean-bean-jeremy-corbyn-does-actually-believe-what-he-stands

Offline Beanfan

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2018, 12:11:11 PM »
Very interesting interview! :thumbsup:
Sean has his own personal  point of view about nowadays politics.

Offline Clairette

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2018, 06:37:14 AM »

Online patch

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2018, 07:05:35 AM »
https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=ru&ie=UTF-8&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.kinopoisk.ru%2Farticle%2F3278296%2F%3Futm_source%3Dtwitter%26utm_medium%3Dsocial%26utm_campaign%3Duzhe-segodnya-na-kinopoiske-mozhno-posmotre&edit-text=

Very nice interview with Sean.
I do not know how well Google has translated from Russian into English, but I hope the main thing will be clear.

Thanks Clairette

Sean Bean - about the "Magnificent Medici", bad guys and screen deaths
Another villain in the gallery of images of Shona Bean is Jacopo de Pazzi, the enemy of the Medici house from the new series about Florentine intrigues
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The new costume-historical series “Magnificent Medici” , which can already be seen today at KinoPoisk, tells about another page in the history of the Florentine rulers and patrons of art.  In the name of saving his beloved Florence, the young Lorenzo Medici takes over the leadership of the family bank.  He is actively involved in politics, extends the economic influence of the family and the city to the whole of Europe, becoming the head of the Florentine Republic.  Patronage of Lorenzo in the field of art, the support of artists by the House of Medici, including Botticelli and Michelangelo, the construction of public buildings not only bring him the title of the Magnificent, but also cause the envy of competitors.  The most dangerous of them - the Pazzi family, weaving a conspiracy against the Medici.

 The role of Lorenzo is played by Daniel Sharman , and his avid enemy Jacopo de Pazzi is Sean Bean .  KinoPoisk met Binom in Florence and talked about the history of this city, the feud between the Medici and de Pazzi, and also remembered the most spectacular deaths of its on-screen characters.

- Tell a little about your hero.

 - Rod Pazzi was an ancient Florentine clan, which, unfortunately, went down in history only because of a conspiracy against the Medici family.  Those were too powerful and rich, and this caused envy of many noble families at that time.  My hero, Jacopo de Pazzi, initiated the plot and his leader, for which he was severely punished.  I do not think this is a spoiler: the history of the Medici and the conspiracy have long been known historical facts.  The problem of my hero was that his ideas about politics, society and lifestyle were too different from the views of the Medici.  The latter were enthusiastic and innovative, but my hero was distinguished by conservatism and did not want changes in society.  He was annoyed by the enthusiasm and idealism of the young Medici.  He himself was considered an extremely pragmatic and mundane man to believe in lofty ideas and an ideal society.  To be honest, I feel sorry for Pazzi, but not because his life was tragically cut short, but because he lived, tormented by envy.  He could not appreciate his brilliant and artistic opponent Lorenzo Medici.  For this, Jacopo was too cruel and crude in nature.

- In the series, Lorenzo is shown as an idealist, while Jacopo is shown as a pragmatist.  How do you feel about idealism?  Do I need him in the acting profession?

 - I think you need to have a large share of idealism in order to decide to become an actor in general.  The intention to live for a living from art can be considered a manifestation of idealism, and people who believe in it - crazy.  However, what is idealism?  Idealism is a way of thinking, a lifestyle.  This is when a person who believes in his ideas often puts himself at risk, and when he falls, he does not learn from his mistakes.  An idealist actor can expect too much from his viewers.  He will hope that he will get only the most brilliant and creative roles.  Idealism is necessarily necessary in our world, because if our world rests on pragmatists, then it is still created by idealists.  I am also an idealist.  It is more interesting for me to play in a small art-house project and enjoy the role, than to chase after blockbusters and big budgets.  Although I also played in them.

- How did the British play the famous rulers of Florence?

 - Difficult to give an exact answer.  Could this be related to financing?  However, I believe that the heritage of Florence has long ceased to be exclusively Italian and turned into a world and universal humanity, like the art that was supported by the Medici, is today part of human history.  My hero, regardless of his origin, was the same person as us.  I do not consider his weaknesses and vices, temperament and character purely Italian.  Envy and rudeness can be inherent in people in different parts of the world.

 - Do you like to play bad guys and villains?

 - The bad guys play much harder.  This makes me an actor’s excitement.  It is at such moments that work begins to give me real pleasure.  It is interesting for me to understand how these people feel, what motivates their actions, how they justify actions that I could never do in real life.  I never killed.  And he did not die.  The acting profession is also interesting in that it is possible to die and revive in it indefinitely.  By the way, I have not had a chance to play the worst of all villains - a serial killer maniac.  And in the plans for this, too, no.

- And what was the most memorable death for you in the movie?

 - From a visual point of view, the most beautiful and heroic was the death of Boromir from The Lord of the Rings .  True, in my opinion, the action there is too delayed.  From the moment when Boromir hit the first arrow, and until when he finally goes into another world, it takes more than ten minutes.  But the most strange and fatal for me was the death in the film “The Field” by Jim Sheridan .  There are cows following me.  I try to escape, fall from a cliff and die tragically.  Animals rush off the cliff after me.  And at the end of the scene, a very strong frame is shown: the body of a man spread out and the corpses of animals scattered around him.  Straight Sergei Eisenstein!

- Do you add something from yourself to the image or maybe learn something from your character?

 - When I was young, it seemed that life brought me something new and unusual every day.  With age - and I have already been in the movies for a long time - I learned to abstract from my work.  My life does not intersect with the life of my heroes.  Therefore, I don’t scoop anything from my roles.  But in the case of the Medici, I learned a lot of interesting historical facts.  For example, before starting work on the Medici project, I was acquainted only with their ingenious banking operations.  When I read the script and prepared for the shooting, I learned how this family lived, I realized what the famous lily flower means - the symbol of Florence.  I was surprised to find that the story of Shakespeare about Romeo and Juliet was not so original, because the Medici and Pazzi also had their Romeo and Juliet.  Only the Florentine lovers were able to overcome difficulties and stay together.

- Where do you like to work more - in TV shows or in movies?

 - Easier to shoot for television.  First, television series are filmed, usually in chronological order.  In the cinema, one cannot afford such luxury.  Secondly, the mode of work on television projects is much more sparing: shooting can take five to six hours a day, and sometimes they even last only an hour or two.  In the movie, the working day comes to 16 hours, and this is really exhausting.

- Do novice actors come to you for advice?

 - To be honest, I think the representatives of the younger generation of actors are much more competent and self-confident than me.  A friend of mine loves to say: “I raised, taught and raised my children.  Now they have grown up, so they teach and educate me! ”

 Today, the younger generation is growing up with ideas about their own uniqueness and exclusivity, and at this age I too often got it from my parents, I also had to overcome my shyness and restraint.  Therefore, I do not like to revise my paintings.  I'm always strange to watch myself from the side.  Also, I would not want to suffer because of the mistakes that I still cannot fix.

- Your characters are very active on the screen.  How do you train?

 - I do not subject myself to special training or diets, like my American colleagues.  I don't do sports regularly.  I start training right before the shooting, but since, I repeat, I went to the cinema a long time ago, I had to ride, fence, wear heavy gear, or run fast.  Therefore, for each new project I don’t need to start everything all over again, but just a little bit to remember what I once memorized.  But as soon as the shooting ends, I again throw all the training.
 
https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=ru&ie=UTF-8&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.kinopoisk.ru%2Farticle%2F3278296%2F%3Futm_source%3Dtwitter%26utm_medium%3Dsocial%26utm_campaign%3Duzhe-segodnya-na-kinopoiske-mozhno-posmotre&edit-text=

Offline Janice1066

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2018, 01:55:02 PM »
Interesting interview, thanks!

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By the way, I have not had a chance to play the worst of all villains - a serial killer maniac.

Has he forgotten The Hitcher??  :huh???:

Offline Clairette

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2018, 10:58:36 PM »
Interesting interview, thanks!

Quote
By the way, I have not had a chance to play the worst of all villains - a serial killer maniac.

Has he forgotten The Hitcher??  :huh???:
Quote
a serial killer maniac
)))

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2018, 07:28:41 AM »
Sean Bean: " The Medici brings a piece of history to the viewer"
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INTERVIEW - Actor Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones plays the sworn enemy of Lawrence the Magnificent in the historical series on the illustrious family of the Renaissance. Imagined by Frank Spotnitz, the saga is a hit in Italy and is broadcast on Saturdays on the Altice channel. This season is centered on the conspiracy of the Pazzi against the Medici in 1478.


With the adaptation of Elena Ferrante's prodigious Friend who arrives this Thursday on Canal +, it's one of the big fall hits of Italian public television. After two years ago, telling the story of Como, who allowed his lineage to become a major political force in Florence, the historical series The Medici looks at the rise of his grandson, the legendary Laurent the Magnificent, patron of the artists of the Renaissance. "A rock revolution", promise the showrunners, to discover discreetly on Altice.

This time, the Anglo-American-Italian fiction, always shot in the Tuscan countryside and its period homes, does not give in to the sensationalist temptation to give the story the accents of crime. No need to invent artificial poisonings like with Dustin Hoffman in season 1. The rivalry between the Medici and the Pazzi is enough to structure his eight episodes. Dark fort. In front of the young lion, played by Daniel Sharman ( Fear The Walking Dead ), Sean Bean ( The Lord of the Rings, Game Of Thrones ) takes the clothes of the conspirator, pragmatic and more rustic, Jacopi de Pazzi and is a captivating antagonist.

"Why this confrontation between bankers of the 15th century speaks to us? Because it is a parable of our time: the young generation challenging the established order, "said Figaro producer Frank Spotnitz ( X-Files, The Master of the High Castle). And to emphasize: "Laurent de Medici is an idealist and wants to use his privileges to remake the world. His leg shows why art and beauty are values ​​to defend. It is a heritage that must constantly be remembered. The approach seduced Sean Bean. The British actor, accustomed to historical fiction, explained to us mid-October why, amazed by the very nice office of the mayor of Florence in which the round table was held. The town is indeed installed in the palace Medici-Riccardi. A building built for Como de Medici.



LE FIGARO - Why did you agree to go back in time in fifteenth-century Italy?
Sean BEAN. - I loved the first season of the Medici, masters of Florence on Como. I really like historical fiction. I discover a lot of elements. Yet in class, history classes bored me royally: only dates, figures, names. But as long as history appeals to imagination and images, it comes to life. Think of Shakespeare's plays: Henry V, Richard III. The Medici brings a piece of history to the viewer. I am also very curious about medieval times and the Renaissance. The bonus was to play in Italy sometimes where our characters evolved. We shot in mansions with period coats of arms.

Who is Jacopo de Pazzi, the adversary of Laurent de Medici, to whom you lend your features?
It's not a bad guy at a discount. Jacopo de Pazzi is a juicy character to embody. He is a lonely, cruel and arrogant man who does not understand at all the fascination that the Medicis have for art. He is only concerned with commerce and finance. This makes him despise and underestimate the Medici.

What surprised you most about your research on the time?
His violence. Jacopo de Pazzi has met a ruthless death, because yes I pass away again! He was hanged and his head was used as a balloon. She got stuck in trees etc.

Why do you like to die so much?
One passes the weapon to the left very often in the historical fictions. In the TV movie Henry VIII where I played the Catholic rebel Robert Aske, I was deceived by the king and nailed to the walls of the castle. In Black death , a feature film with Eddie Redmayne about the ravages of the plague, I was quartered between two horses. I think it's my favorite death!

You made your name in the 90s thanks to the TV adaptation of the Sharpe novels , this British soldier fighting during the Napoleonic wars. Has the way of doing historical series changed a lot?
Thanks to the green screens, one can give the illusion of a crowd of soldiers, of an immense cavalry, to reconstitute castles. With Sharpe , it was much more artisanal. We did not have many extras. They went back and forth on camera to make an illusion! It was very old school.

Will you be in front of your screen for the last season of Game of Thrones ?
Like you, I am in absolute ignorance of what will happen. On the other hand, I took part in a meeting of actors of the series in Belfast. It was hosted by American presenter Conan O'Brien and will be on the DVD of this eighth season.
http://tvmag.lefigaro.fr/programme-tv/sean-bean-les-medicis-amene-un-pan-d-histoire-chez-le-spectateur-_4cb04918-f4bd-11e8-885a-b1fb59570753/

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2019, 12:01:26 AM »
« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 03:08:32 PM by patch »

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2019, 12:00:36 AM »
Sean Bean: Another baby? Yes. That would be nice

The actor is famous for his tough roles and how many ways he has died on screen, but he shows Andrew Billen his softer side
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One rule always applies when interviewing the actor Sean Bean. Journalists may ask him about his latest project — in this case Sky’s new dystopian thriller Curfew in which he plays a terrifying underground car salesman. They may discuss the performances that have won him armies of fans in Sharpe, Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones. His subtler work, such as his Bafta-winning portrayal of a Catholic priest in the BBC’s Broken, will obviously be a focus. And do ask about his “hobbies”. His tortuous private life, however, is off limits.

Picture my surprise then, when, while waiting for him at the fancifully plush Rosewood Hotel in central London, I am introduced first to Bean’s wife. One doesn’t want to make out Bean,…
 
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/times2/sean-bean-another-baby-yes-that-would-be-nice-szq3j8w3p


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Nice interview in @thetimes today, 👌🏻 @ashleybeanx
 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BuCIU5anqlD/





Sean Bean, 59, reveals he is ready for more children after marrying fifth wife Ashley Moore, 33... as he admits age has helped him reflect on his past mistakes
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Sean Bean admits he is open to the prospect of having more children at the age of 59 after finally settling with his fifth wife, former actress Ashley Moore.

The celebrated actor exchanged vows with Moore, who at 33 is 26-years his junior, in 2017 after a five-year relationship that began with 'a chance meeting' in his favourite North London pub.

But he admits four previous marriages, from which he has fathered three daughters, has not dissuaded him from considering a fourth child, and his first with his Moore, as he enters his 60th year.

Weighing up the possibility of more children, he told The Times: ‘Possibly, yes. With Ashley, yeah. That would be nice, that.’

Bean's relationship with his wife began unexpectedly, with the pair making an immediate connection after meeting in Belize Park bar The Cobden Arms, a stones' throw from his former home in the affluent London suburb.

'She was there with friends and I came in with my friend and it was just a chance meeting,' he recalled. 'I used to go in there now and again, but it was the first time she'd ever been in. We kind of hit it off.'

While Moore's 'optimism and vibrancy' has helped change his life, the actor says advancing age has also given him the ability to look back at his previous relationships  with a greater degree of maturity.

'You know, you look back on things and and think, "Maybe I should have done that in a different way. Maybe I wouldn't have done that. I'd do that differently now."

'But then again, you're a lot younger, they're different times and you think, "Would I have done that? Would I really do it any differently?"'
 
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-6716585/Sean-Bean-59-reveals-ready-children-marrying-fifth-wife-Ashley-Moore-33.html


« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 12:55:15 PM by patch »

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Re: Sean Bean interview
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2019, 06:18:23 AM »

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« Last Edit: Today at 01:14:27 AM by patch »