News: Please be patient while modifications are made to the new themes to add in familiar menus and features.

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 

Author Topic: The Young Messiah reviews  (Read 6558 times)

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
The Young Messiah reviews
« on: February 15, 2016, 11:44:20 AM »
"THE YOUNG MESSIAH"

Quote

"The Young Messiah" shows lots of homework was done. No trendy twenty-first-century ideas plopped in. No outlandish "what if" musings (beyond Jesus bringing a bird back to life). The dialogue is so carefully crafted that every word effortlessly rings true in these fully fleshed-out and delightful characters. The text of the Scriptures is faithfully adhered to (without really taking liberties) and then sundry plot points--that totally work--are skillfully woven in to bring life to the text. Every scene is to support the text, not draw away from it. All exposition is invisible and clever. The almost all-British cast slays it.

This story, this film believes. (Not everyone who worked on/in the film necessarily believes, of course, but the film itself does.) This is the beauty of virsimilitude and acting: putting oneself "in the place of" with every fiber of one's being.

This story of one year in the life of the Child Jesus begins with Jesus in Egypt being bullied by another boy from the Jewish community, and escalates into some gripping action which it maintains to one degree or another throughout the film. Never boring. Never trite. There are no hackneyed turns of phrases. The theology is precise. This film has everything in it but the sensational.

 Wunderkind, Adam Greaves-Neal (it's his first film role and he was chosen from among 2000 child actors all over the world), plays Jesus with childlike openness, earnestness and chutzpah, and avoids gooey sentimentality (as does the whole film). His facial expressions and reactions are just completely natural. You will fall in love with this little Jesus and just want to hug him. Mary and Joseph are the consistently best Mary and Joseph the screen has seen (Sara Lazzaro [Italian & American] and Vincent Walsh [Irish: raised in Dublin & Toronto]). There aren't just a few good scenes or lines for these two. The whole film exposes what it might be like to be the world's most unique couple, with their utter devotion to Jesus and to each other.

Jesus must slowly grasp who he is and learn to keep his powers under wraps for now. He's moved by human misery, pain, suffering and sickness, and realizes that when he prays over people or asks God for something: healing occurs, miracles happen. And others are watching, too. Herod Jr.--as despicable as his father--begins to get wind of a little healer boy and realizes that he is just the right age to be the Messiah, "Wonder-Counselor, Prince of Peace." Maybe this child escaped the Bethlehem bloodbath.

He sends his centurion (Sean Bean)--who was also present at Bethlehem and carried out the slaughter--to find and kill the boy Jesus. This constant believable danger, with its attending intrigue and narrow escapes make for an urgency to the whole film.

Big, big money must have been thrown at this production--just from the looks of the sets and extras. The music starts off as standard Bible movie music, but then gets a bit more diverse and disappears into the film, adding to the overall excellence of the experience.

Only the best writers, filmmakers and thespians could pull off such an engrossing marvel as "The Young Messiah." I am in awe. It would be grand if this same set of creative geniuses would do the adult Jesus, but YM is gift enough.

I never watch movies twice, but I could run out to the theater and watch "The Young Messiah" over and over and over.
http://hellburns.blogspot.nl/2016/02/movies-young-messiah.html#.VsIK-f32Z9B



« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 11:49:41 AM by patch »

Offline lab183

  • Frisk-eh's Playhouse
  • Merrick's Clone
  • *
  • Posts: 521
  • Life is a song, love is the music
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2016, 12:48:06 PM »
Sorry, but the only part of this movie I am interested in is seeing Sean in the Centurion costume.  :pant:

I will be waiting for the DVD so I can get closeups and slow motion! I am really not this shallow all the time.

I feel these religious epics have been done and done and done...now with that said I did enjoy the 1950's 10 Commandments because 1) it became a tradition in my family to watch it; 2) it was such an awesome display of over the top ham bone acting, not to mention the narration was truly compelling - gotta love the Carradine family. 3)John Derek as Joshua was very nice to look at and 4) Anne Baxter had the best costumes! Extremely sexy given the time period! And lastly the story itself just cannot be beat - c'mon who doesn't love seeing the sea open up and part like that? ;-)  All hail Cecil B. DeMille!  :kissy

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2016, 03:46:21 AM »
Thanks Rebecca

The Young Messiah: Must See Bible Movie About Jesus. No Hollywood Bizarro World This Time.


Quote
I am here to say that the new film coming out in March, The Young Messiah, is NOT one of those films. The Young Messiah is a great movie, well told, and very faithful to the spirit of the Gospel of what it may have been like for the young seven-year old Jesus to come of age as the Son of God. I highly recommend it for all Christians. It’s warm, touching and a beautiful portrayal of the chosen family struggling through extraordinary times and extraordinary difficulties with an extraordinary child. There is humor with a lovable yet rascally uncle Cleopas, and brilliant villainy with a skanky Herod Antipas, as well as a blond beautiful Robert Downey Jr.-like Satan.

It’s always tough to depict Satan. Gibson’s androgynous female with mutant baby was brilliant, but this one is great for a different reason. The New Testament describes Satan as a deceptive angel of light, so making him beautiful creates an eerie irony as he seeks to figure out what the plan of the young Messiah is, since the New Testament says the principalities and powers didn’t really know what the plan was, otherwise they wouldn’t have crucified him (1Corinthians 2:8).

And the story adds a dramatic stakes of life and death with a Roman centurion played by Sean Bean hunting down the elusive child on orders from Herod Antipas to kill him (because of the failure of his father to do so at the Slaughter of Innocents in Bethlehem years earlier). This was a brilliant addition to the story that was not in the novel, but makes the story more exciting as a movie. (Of course, it’s hard to make the danger seem real cause we know that he won’t ultimately kill Jesus, but the drama and suspense are still entertaining, as is the centurion’s own spiritual journey, since he had participated in the original Slaughter of Innocents)
 
http://godawa.com/movies/supernatural/the-young-messiah-must-see-bible-movie-about-jesus-no-hollywood-bizarro-world-this-time/

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2016, 07:25:28 AM »
Quote
in fact, the entire cast does a remarkable job, particularly Sean Bean as Severus, a Roman centurion, Sara Lazzaro as Mary and Vincent Walsh as Joseph. They are all likable and proficient in their roles. Even Severus, though a ruthless killer when necessary, realizes that there is something “special” about young Jesus

The film has some scenes of violence, including instances of men on crosses, without being nailed, and the violence of the Roman soldiers, who wield their swords. Yet the scenes are not gratuitous. The film is imaginative and captures moments that could have happened in the life of young Jesus. Though obviously the missing years in the life of Jesus are imagined, the movie adheres to the Gospel story of Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem to Mary and Joseph, their flight into Egypt, and his love for the Scriptures and his Father’s house. We are pleased to award the film our “Faith-Friendly” Seal for ages 12-plus. “The Young Messiah” vividly portrays the early life of Jesus as he surely was — a special boy who was much more than a carpenter’s son.
http://www.dove.org/review/11727-the-young-messiah/

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2016, 12:16:37 AM »
The Young Messiah – Christian Movie Review

Quote
The Redemption of Sean Bean’s Character Severus

“There’s only one miracle. Roman steel.”

That’s what Sean Bean says in response to someone mentioning the miracles of the young Jesus. Other actors might have put too much into the line and made it campy, but Sean Bean leans into it with just enough weight. He convincingly carves out the stone-cold grimness of a Roman soldier who has spent his life killing innocent people as a part of his job. The story of young Jesus is not the only compelling story arc in the film, in other words. We see the journey of a cold-hearted Roman centurion as he deals with the ghosts of his past: he was one of the soldiers who participated in the murder of all the boys under two years of age in Bethlehem decades prior. The way the film works that Bethlehem slaughter into the emotional layers of the plot was effective.

 
In other words, I’m wanting to know what will happen to Severus as much as I’m wanting to know what will happen to Jesus. It’s such a great juxtaposition because the two characters–a grizzled, hardened soldier and an innocent boy–stand on opposite ends of the spectrum in just about every way imaginable.
http://rockingodshouse.com/the-young-messiah-christian-movie-review/

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2016, 09:18:59 AM »
Nothing new in The Young Messiah

Quote
The man-child with a crown is not pleased with all the Messiah talk coming from “witches and lizard-eaters” out there, and dispatches a Roman centurion, played by veteran of stage and screen Sean Bean, to find the boy and kill him. “You’ve done it before” he says, taunting the centurion—“it” being the slaughter of children. This exchange sets up one of the film’s primary storylines. Bean’s character is suffering from Bethlehem massacre PTSD. He acknowledges the latest child-kill he has been ordered to perform, but we can tell his heart is just not in it.

Herein lies the film’s central flaw: Roman centurion versus Jesus Christ has spoiler alert written all over it. We know Jesus survives his childhood—of this, there is no doubt. Ideally, the drama should default to the inner turmoil of the centurion, which would give the audience something more to chew on besides popcorn. Unfortunately, the script stops shy of exploring this personal dilemma to any great extent, and Bean plays it too nice from the get-go, so the Murderous Beast to Roman-with-a-Heart transformation whimpers where it might have roared.

 Lastly, and not to be overlooked, given recent attention to Hollywood’s appalling lack of diversity, The Young Messiah is yet another “whitewashed” production. Occasional brown eyes notwithstanding, when all principal players have British accents and could easily pass for guest stars on Downton Abbey, the lack of ethnic authenticity is, for this viewer anyway, an unfortunate distraction. 
http://www.anglicanjournal.com/articles/nothing-new-in-the-young-messiah



Quote
One of the perks of maintaining a blog (and a strong Twitter following) is getting invited to preview upcoming films. That is how I got to see the unlikely Lenten film, The Young Messiah, before its release in theaters.


 When Herod's son (who looks like the Satan figure, but without the bleached hair) hears rumors about a boy who escaped the Bethlehem slaughter, he sends a Roman centurion on a mission to finish what he himself had done those years earlier. The several encounters (and near misses) between the boy and the soldier keep the plot moving through to a pivotal moment in the Temple. 

Casting was totally on target. Joseph (Vincent Walsh) is spectacular, and Severus (Sean Bean) does a marvelous job showing the centurion's long-suppressed humanity struggle for the upper hand.
 The physical settings in Matera, Italy and in Rome's Cinecittá studios are superb. The location titles in Papyrus font, not so much. 
http://romans8v29.blogspot.nl/2016/03/the-young-messiah-filling-in-blanks-in.html




« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 09:33:13 AM by patch »

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2016, 11:37:15 AM »

The Young Messiah (2016) Movie Review by JWU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5M11bC43Nw

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2016, 01:30:21 AM »
The Young Messiah

Quote
At times, I did wish that the Centurion’s story had become a more nuanced part of the story but at the end of the story, it becomes obvious that his character is only a very minor figure here.
http://www.johnhanlonreviews.com/movie-review/the-young-messiah-review/

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2016, 04:56:44 AM »

Quote
Herod's demise frees the family to return home, although the obsessed centurion Severus (Sean Bean) is still searching for Jesus and sees a little King of the Jews lurking behind every rock.
 
http://www.kamwilliams.com/2016/03/the-young-messiah.html

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2016, 08:59:58 AM »
Haven't You Ever Wondered about Jesus as The Young Messiah?

Quote
The subplot involving the Roman soldiers on a mission to kill Jesus offers little tension or dramatic stakes, as we know their efforts are destined to be futile. Overall, the film's efforts at suspense rely too much on Jesus being in peril. As the lead soldier, Sean Bean provides a credible internal conflict about his mission, but the film's emotional and contemplative core lies elsewhere. Also, in an age when culture is more sensitive to ethnic authenticity, the mostly-British (and all-British-sounding) cast keeps us from experiencing a full immersion into this time and place.
http://www.crosswalk.com/culture/movies/the-young-messiah-movie-review.html

Offline Rebecca

  • First Acolyte
  • Sharpe's Siren
  • *
  • Posts: 1819
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2016, 09:28:07 AM »
Quote
Also, in an age when culture is more sensitive to ethnic authenticity, the mostly-British (and all-British-sounding) cast keeps us from experiencing a full immersion into this time and place.
Huh? So... would he feel more completely immersed if they were all speaking American? Or English with some pseudo-Middle Eastern accents? I don't get this at all. The only thing authentic would be if they were speaking Aramaic, Hebrew, Latin and Greek.  People don't seem to demand that in for example, World War II movies the Germans speak German the Russians speak Russian, etc.

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2016, 12:39:34 PM »
‘The Young Messiah’ Is the Best Faith-Based Movie of the Year

Quote
Go see this movie and send a message to Hollywood that this is the kind of movie you want to see made.
https://tifwe.org/the-young-messiah/

Offline Rebecca

  • First Acolyte
  • Sharpe's Siren
  • *
  • Posts: 1819
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2016, 02:14:25 PM »
The Young Messiah Review by Steven D. Greydanus

Quote
Even after Herod the Great’s death, Matthew’s Gospel hints that the Holy Family was still in danger from his son, Herod Antipas. The Young Messiah proposes that a rumor has reached the younger Herod (effectively creepy Jonathan Bailey) that a child of Bethlehem — perhaps the Child — escaped his father’s bloody purge. Sean Bean (The Lord of the Rings), the film’s one major star, gives an impressively controlled performance as a crusty, seasoned Roman tribune named Severus who is tasked with tracking down the child and finishing the job.
Quote
Part of the drama lies in the fact that Satan (Rory Keenan), in keeping with some theological speculation, recognizes that young Jesus is something out of the ordinary, but isn’t sure what — and that Jesus isn’t either. This is a startling, challenging idea.

Quote
Some devout souls will find the idea of limitations in Jesus’ knowledge blasphemous. It is not.

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2016, 02:39:00 AM »
The Young Messiah review – it'll be a miracle if you stay awake

God knows who’ll enjoy this dull, cheap-looking and laughably scripted account of what might have happened in Jesus’s childhood


Quote
Now I understand why Jesus’s childhood remains such a mystery: the story is unbelievably boring.

 After the move back to Nazareth, Jesus is drawn to Jerusalem during Passover. Unbeknown to the family, Herod Antipas (Jonathan Bailey), a perverted sleaze who slinks around like Jim Morrison and sounds as if he has sacks of loose change in his pockets, has heard that there’s a boy out in the sticks performing miracles. Taking a papyrus out of his father’s book, the new king decides it’s better to be safe, and despatches a Roman soldier (Sean Bean) to have this boy killed.
While this may suggest there’s a little bit of action, let me warn you: this movie is all about evoking the idea of being trapped inside a house of worship in uncomfortable clothes when all you want to do is go out and play

The Young Messiah is being marketed to church groups, but even the paying customers at the screening I attended were chuckling at the lame dialogue.
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/mar/11/the-young-messiah-review-itll-be-a-miracle-if-you-stay-awake



'Young Messiah' lacks passion

Quote
Devout Christian audiences might find the film’s scriptural resonances inspiring (or perhaps scandalously blasphemous, because they’re based on apocrypha). Ordinary moviegoers may wonder why the picture’s so dryly earnest.
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/moviesnow/la-et-mn-young-messiah-review-20160310-story.html







Movie asks, 'What was Jesus like as a child?'

Quote
This gives the entire film a mysterious, suspenseful twist, as the boy struggles to understand the miraculous powers He’s already displaying, and a demon that follows Him tries to fathom His true identity.

And when the family returns to Israel after King Herod’s death, another, whole layer of suspense is added in the form of a Roman soldier (played by Hollywood pro Sean Bean) tasked with finding and killing the boy who has returned from Egypt.

The movie’s production values and entertainment value are exemplary, a story filled with distinct and well-blended characters, believable acting, and a script well balanced with mystery and humor. This is no “Christian movie,” but a first-rate, Hollywood production.

“The Young Messiah,” however, is not a catechism, not doctrine, not the biblical story. It’s an exercise, a poem or a song about Jesus in movie form, and an entertaining one at that. I’m afraid I can’t recommend it as highly as I did “Risen” only a few weeks ago, but it’s still a film that Christian audiences especially may profit from seeing and discussing and debating at great length.




Content advisory:
•“The Young Messiah,” rated PG-13, contains neither obscenity nor profanity.
•The film does contain some sexuality, including a shirtless man bathing, a dancing girl scantily clad with lurid movements and flashing cleavage, male courtiers in heavy makeup with the possible implication of homosexuality, a lewd comment, and a scene where a man violently attempts to rape a woman but is thwarted.
•The movie also has some gore and violence, including wrestling, beating, blood, swordplay, death, crucified and bleeding bodies, blood splatters and screams as soldiers kill children and a man painfully stabbed to death.
•The film contains a significant amount of religious content, not only in its theme material, but in quoting Scripture, depicting miracles and reenacting some scenes actually contained in Scripture. The movie also depicts a demonic character that follows and torments Jesus and a character who has tormented visions of snakes.

 
http://www.wnd.com/2016/03/movie-asks-what-was-jesus-like-as-a-child/




Review: 'The Young Messiah' is Wholly, Holy Crap

Quote
Weirdly, Chris Columbus is a producer, which may explain why the principal antagonist of the movie is named Severus. Like Alan Rickman’s famous professor, this is the character clearly intended to give the film gravitas, and as such Sean Bean steps into the role of a Roman Centurion who is sent to kill the kid but [obvious SPOILER] winds up a believer. If George Clooney hadn’t already done this exact role better as a spoof in the Coen brothers’ recent Hail, Caesar!, I might have taken Bean more seriously.

Given little crossover appeal to casual Christians, The Young Messiah may optimistically be shooting for God’s Not Dead/Son of God-sized grosses of around $60 million, which ought to make back its relatively low-looking budget. 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lukethompson/2016/03/11/review-the-young-messiah-is-wholly-holy-crap/#5704f2951a60



« Last Edit: March 11, 2016, 07:51:10 AM by patch »

Offline lab183

  • Frisk-eh's Playhouse
  • Merrick's Clone
  • *
  • Posts: 521
  • Life is a song, love is the music
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2016, 09:15:37 AM »
Quote
Also, in an age when culture is more sensitive to ethnic authenticity, the mostly-British (and all-British-sounding) cast keeps us from experiencing a full immersion into this time and place.
Huh? So... would he feel more completely immersed if they were all speaking American? Or English with some pseudo-Middle Eastern accents? I don't get this at all. The only thing authentic would be if they were speaking Aramaic, Hebrew, Latin and Greek.  People don't seem to demand that in for example, World War II movies the Germans speak German the Russians speak Russian, etc.

You are so right, Rebecca. On the surface, it's a very strange critique/comment they made. The reason they are even saying this is because it involves religion. No other movie would be held up to this kind of scrutiny. People are just very, very touchy when it comes to the Bible and religion. It's about belief and there is a bit of a movement going on where certain religious leaders are trying to inspire people's faith by giving them a more accurate historical context to put these religious stories into. The more "real" it is, the easier it is to believe.


Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2016, 01:37:22 AM »
Developmental Divinity: a Review of “The Young Messiah”



Quote
he Young Messiah, a film based on a novel by Anne Rice, is about Roman soldiers in the employ of Herod Antipas looking to hunt down a boy named Jesus, a rumored miracle worker, who seven years previously may have escaped Herod the Great’s slaughter of the innocents.

Sean Bean, who is so often killed off in movies and (as in Game of Thrones) on TV (IMDB actually keeps a list), plays Severus, a Roman soldier who is an almost direct analogue to the Tribune, Clavius, in another 2016 film, Risen. And like that later Roman, Severus is investigating a mystery, except it’s not the man’s disappearance but the boy’s reemergence. Whereas Clavius was out to quash rumors about the Resurrection of Jesus; Severus is charged with making sure He will not live to have a Bar Mitzvah.
 

Quote
My wife actually fell asleep during the film, and was still rubbing her eyes as we were leaving the theater.

“Whatja think?” she asked.

I showed her my gravest countenance: You have to ask?

She nodded and shrugged.

“Well,” she yawned, “at least Sean Bean didn’t die.”

Actually, I suspect he did a little when he saw the final cut of The Young Messiah.
 
https://www.thecatholicthing.org/2016/03/12/developmental-divinity-a-review-of-the-young-messiah/?utm_content=buffer6ceb4&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer





Film Review: ‘The Young Messiah’

Quote
This pious drama is a work of minimal imagination and even less subtlety.

By the time its characters have reached the Jerusalem temple where Jesus is destined to triumphantly face off against Severus, “The Young Messiah” has delivered so little in the way of urgent or meditative drama that its climactic attempts at uplift fall flat. A final, somewhat uncertain note, however, suggests that the filmmakers may be saving a more introspective examination of Christ’s nature for a forthcoming “Jesus: The Teen Years” sequel. 
http://variety.com/2016/film/reviews/the-young-messiah-review-1201728229/




« Last Edit: March 12, 2016, 06:34:42 AM by patch »

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2016, 12:29:09 AM »
'The Young Messiah' will resonate for believers and non-believers alike

Quote
The strongest performance within the fabric of “The Young Messiah” comes from Sean Bean. As Severus, he commands the screen with his presence both emotionally and physically, while infusing an unspoken sensitivity into not only Severus, but the story as a whole. His eyes and facial expressiveness are telling of the crisis of conscience Severus has over not only his participation in the slaughter in Bethlehem seven years ago, but in the new order from Herod to find and kill this child with the little carved camel. Noteworthy is that as with the recent “Risen”, focusing on a main character with a the viewpoint as a Roman “non-believer” works wonderfully as setting the stage for "either-or" and a broader understanding of the big picture to see hardened men question themselves and their path in life. Bean embodies the essence of this as Severus.

“The Young Messiah” is a film for believers and non-believers alike. But for a few issues Columbus, Nowrasteh and company have done a loving job of telling a story no one has told before; believably stretching the imagination but finding that balance of history and theology, appealing to believers and non-believers, not to mention movie-goers who just want to see a well done film.
http://www.examiner.com/article/the-young-messiah-will-resonate-for-believers-and-non-believers-alike



The Young Messiah - Jesus' Superhero Origin Story

Quote
Too boring to be anything other than fluff, The Young Messiah has a potentially promising premise, but doesn't do anything with it..

 Sean Bean is the most watchable, but even he looks bored more often than not.
http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/moviesandtv/reviews/cinemarter/16870-The-Young-Messiah-2016-Christian-Movie-Review.2#&gid=gallery_5963&pid=5



« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 02:42:50 AM by patch »

Offline patch

  • News Hound
  • Ulric's Lady
  • *
  • Posts: 18304
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2016, 01:08:30 AM »
THE YOUNG MESSIAH

Quote
  Bean is the biggest name by far here and seems reluctant to be present, trundling through his part as the designated antagonist. When Herod Antipas is berating Severus for failing in his mission on the first try, Bean mutters “yes, my lord, I understand. It’s difficult,” with a laughable flatness.   

http://themovieandme.blogspot.nl/2016/03/the-young-messiah.html

Offline lasue

  • Frisk-eh's Playhouse
  • Vronsky's Vixen
  • *
  • Posts: 3361
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2016, 06:30:24 PM »
I think most of these critics would rather just see another silly action movie with NO CONTENT and a lot of special
effects !! They don't want to use their minds to analyze anything. After I saw this film I thought about it for 2 days.
Movies like batman are only real when your watch them. After you leave the theatre you forget about what you
just saw, because it's all JUNK with NO STORY !!

Offline Rebecca

  • First Acolyte
  • Sharpe's Siren
  • *
  • Posts: 1819
Re: The Young Messiah reviews
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2016, 01:06:16 AM »
Quote
I think most of these critics would rather just see another silly action movie with NO CONTENT and a lot of special effects !! They don't want to use their minds to analyze anything. After I saw this film I thought about it for 2 days. Movies like batman are only real when your watch them. After you leave the theatre you forget about what you just saw, because it's all JUNK with NO STORY !!

I think, too, that any Jesus film brings out emotional reactions from people, and in our post-Christian society, a lot of that emotion is negative. I was perusing the IDMb message board for this film and was just amazed at the lack of intelligent comments; I would wager that 97% of the posts are by people who have not even seen the movie but just want to vent against Jesus, Christianity, or religion.  There were loads of one-star ratings by the users even before the film was released, and I am fairly sure these were ratings by militant atheists because it is very rare to see so many one-stars there.  On the other end of the negativity spectrum, there is an intense debate about the film's theology going on in the conservative Catholic blogosphere with some claiming it's blasphemous. It's really hard to please anybody when you do a Jesus film.